Logo en Global Donate now

Online Database: Working for the abolition of legalized migrant enslavement through information sharing

GlobalChange

Document Details

 

Print and save

Journal article

From Slaves, Convicts, and Servants to Free Passengers: The Transformation of Immigration in the Era of the American Revolution

Date

1998-06-23

Authors

Aaron S. Fogleman

Abstract

For the first two centuries of the history of British North America, one word best
characterizes the status of the vast majority of immigrants -servitude. From the
founding ofJamestown until the Revolution, nearly three-fourths of all immigrants
to the thirteen colonies arrived in some condition of unfreedom. (See tables 1 and
2.) These migrations of slaves, convicts, and servants played a critical role in the
demographic, economic, social, and cultural development of the colonies. When
they came (or were brought) in large numbers, these strangers often caused a sen-
sation in colonial society. Yet at a time when servitude was considered "normal,"
few were concerned that their arrival in America meant a temporary or permanent
loss of freedom for most of them.1

Journal title

Oxford Journals

Volume

83

Issue

1

Page numbers

43-76

Publisher

Oxford University Press

File Attachments

Links

Economic sectors

General relevance - all sectors

Content types

Past policies

Target groups

Researchers

Geographical focuses

United States

Languages

English